Bahama Woodstar

Nesophlox evelynae

Order

APODIFORMES

Family

Hummingbirds (Trochilidae)

Code 4

BAWO

Code 6

NESEVE

ITIS

ILLUSTRATION

ask community

Copyright © 2021 Mitch Waite Group

PHOTOS

CONSERVATION STATUS

Least Concern

The Bahama Woodstar has a small range restricted to most of the Bahama Islands. It occurs in a variety of pine forest and edge habitats and has also occurred as a vagrant in the United States in Florida, and once, Pennsylvania. Although there is no exact estimation of the population of the Bahama Woodstar, it has been described as frequent within its limited range. Consequently, the conservation rating of the Bahama Woodstar is Least Concern.

VOTE: ILLUSTRATION

Rate this Illustration: Excellent Very Good Good
Fair Below Avg Poor

SUMMARY

Overview

Bahama Woodstar: Medium-sized hummingbird with iridescent green upperparts, violet-pink throat, partial white collar, and mixed buff- and olive-green underparts; may have pink-tinged forehead; forked tail is black with orange-brown center; bill is slightly decurved. Female is duller with pale gray throat, and orange-brown belly and outer tail feathers. Very agile flight. Hovers to drink nectar and sallies to catch insects in-flight. The American Ornithological Society has made two changes to the Bahama Woodstar since 2015. First, it was split into two species, the Bahama Woodstar (Calliphlox evelynae) and Inagua Woodstar (Calliphlox lyrura). In 2019, both species were moved to the Nesophlox genus because genetic data showed they do not share a common ancestor with other Calliphlox species.


Range and Habitat North America

Bahama Woodstar: Endemic in the Bahamas. Even though this is a mostly non-migratory bird, it has been seen as a vagrant in southeastern Florida in the United States. Will use a variety of semi-open and brushy habitats, including forest edges and brushy undergrowth, areas of low-growing, scrubby vegetation, and suburban gardens.


Range and Habitat Hawaii


Range and Habitat Palau

whatbird search for your browser

INTERESTING FACTS

  • The Bahama Woodstar nests all year round and does not migrate.
  • Tails on male birds are deeply forked, females are much more rounded.
  • A group of hummingbirds has many collective nouns, including a “bouquet", "glittering", "hover", "shimmer", and "tune” of hummingbirds.

SIMILAR BIRDS

RANGE MAP NORTH AMERICA

About this North America Map

This map shows how this species is distributed across North America.

FAMILY DESCRIPTION



SONGS AND CALLS

Xeno-Canto Sound

Bahama Woodstar WW1

  • Title: Bahama Woodstar WW1
  • Recordist: Jesse Fagan
  • Description: Rapid "pri-titidee" calls as a pair interact in flight.
  • Location: bs
  • Date: "September 1, 2016"

Voice Text

"tit, titit, tit, tit, titit"

Vocalization

Bahama Swallow: Call is a sharp, staccato "tit, titit, tit, tit, titit." Chase call is rapid, dry, and rattling. Song is a jumble of high squeaks and raspy notes much like an angler winding a reel.

TERMINOLOGY

CREDITS

Author

Artist

Chris Vest

.
UpperpartsX
Back, rump, hindneck, wings, and crown.
BellyX
The ventral part of the bird, or the area between the flanks on each side and the crissum and breast. Flight muscles are located between the belly and the breast.
CollarX
Similar to the upper part of the human neck, located at the back of the crown.
Outer tail feathersX
The tail feathers farthest from the center.
UnderpartsX

Belly, undertail coverts, chest, flanks, and foreneck.

GorgetX
A small iridescent patch on the throat of a hummingbird.
Parts of a Standing bird X
Head Feathers and Markings X
Parts of a Flying bird X